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Posts from the ‘Writing’ Category

R is for … Reversal

Warning: this blog post contains spoilers. They will be called out, but the onus is on you to decide whether you want to continue and read a spoiler for a novel you haven’t read.

Now that’s out of the way, what is a reversal? A reversal can take many forms but is generally either a drastic change in circumstances for a character, or a change in direction for the plot. Reversals can help prevent your story from becoming predictable.

You could have a story where a man goes from rags to riches in a short space of time, changing his fortune (Brewster’s Millions), or one where the opposite takes place. Or, where an unreliable narrator turns out to be the ‘baddie’, after getting the reader to sympathise with them through the story.

One of the more memorable reversals I’ve read, was at the end of Lord of the Rings.

SPOILER ALERT

The spoiler will appear after the following pictures, so scroll at your own risk.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you’re still here, you’ve obviously either read the book, watched the films, or you don’t mind spoilers. All right, let’s begin.

For the whole of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the main plot follows Frodo Baggins and Sam Gangee. From the moment they set out from Rivendell, they’re on a quest to go to Mount Doom and destroy the One Ring. Yes, there are lots of other plots happening all the way through, but this is the major plot line. One awful thing after another befalls them, but they make it through. At the climactic moment, Frodo stands over the volcano with the One Ring in his hand and … he can’t do it. Wearing the ring and carrying it have affected him to the point where he becomes convinced he can make everything better if he holds on to it. Of course, we know that this is how the ring works, and that if he doesn’t destroy it everything will be lost, but the ring is affecting his judgement and he decides he’s going to keep it. Oh Frodo! What a betrayal.

Then, out of nowhere, his own madness from the ring at the forefront of his actions, Gollum comes shrieking into view to try to take the ring from Frodo. He bites off Frodo’s finger (ring and all) before hurtling to his death in the volcano below. First time readers of the trilogy don’t see that coming.

We have more than one reversal going on here.

  • Frodo’s desire to do good is subverted by the ring, and despite knowing the importance of destroying it, he decides to keep it in the belief that, for him, everything will be different. He, where everyone else has failed, will wield the ring and become a benevolent ruler.
  • Gollum, the most pathetic character in the trilogy, saves the day. However, it’s not altruistic on his part; again, the ring is exerting its influence over him. His need for the ring drives him.

Of course, to make a good reversal work well, it can’t come as a total surprise. You have to lay a groundwork of subtle signs to mark the way for when you reach that point, without making it obvious beforehand. The trick is to make your reader think that the story is going to go one way (Frodo’s struggles to get to Mount Doom and his eventually reaching there), but also drop in enough foreshadowing for the reversal not to be completely out of the blue.  Tolkein does this by having Gollum tracking Frodo for most of the story. He’s seen following them down the river; he becomes their captive at one point, before escaping, so we’re used to seeing him turn up. And then there’s the line where Tolkein foreshadows everything by literally having Gandalf tell the reader what’s going to happen. This comes when Frodo asks Gandalf why Bilbo spared Gollum:

“And he is bound up with the fate of the Ring. My heart tells me that he has some part to play yet, for good or ill, before the end; and when that comes, the pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many – yours not least.”

It’s cleverly buried in a conversation where we might not think much about it at the time, but here the scene is set for what ultimately takes place.

In my novel, The Lost Weaver, I have a similarly dramatic reversal take place in the climactic scenes. I’m not going to go into detail because the novel hasn’t been published, yet. You can bet, though, that I’ve both hinted at and misdirected all the way to that moment. I can’t wait to see if readers see it coming.

If I do it right, they won’t until it happens. And then they’ll say, ‘Oh! Of course.”

 

J is for … Journal

penThere’s something satisfying about writing things down. Not typing onto a computer; the act of physically, taking a pen and writing something down. I used to do this a lot when I was younger, before I had a computer, or a typewriter (yes, I’m old enough to remember those). I would sit and write in notebooks all the time. Writing stories, or just my thoughts.

 

Even those terribly emo poems I wrote as a teenager, about love and death, and how miserable life was.

It wasn’t just creative writing. It was a way of taking the emotions I was feeling deep inside and examining them in the light. Why did I feel that way? Was it me? Or was my reaction to something justified? Sometimes, simply writing it all down allowed me to get it off my chest and move on. It allowed me to talk through the things I didn’t feel I could discuss with anyone. Most of the time, though, it helped me to work through my issues and realise they weren’t as bad as I thought, or simply not worth the attention I was giving them.

Somewhere along the line, I discovered that I could write more with a computer because my fingers flew over the keys and I could write as fast as I could think, and that was that. I stopped writing journals. I would write emails or forum posts to the people who made me angry, and then delete them without sending. That became my catharsis. Sometimes, I’d actually hit send, or post. This is never a good idea, because you always end up being the jerk, regardless of how justifiable your anger felt at the time. Nine times out of ten, the other person isn’t trying to wind you up, or deliberately stamp all over your feelings. They’re simply oblivious, and you having a melt down in their inbox, or on a forum, is the first clue they get that there’s a problem.

It’s the same on social media. You say exactly what you think at the time and ‘boom’, it’s out there. Often before you’ve had the opportunity to examine why you feel that way. Once it’s out there, you can’t take it back. In fact, once it’s out there, it’s out there forever. Even when it’s embarrassing.

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Especially when it’s embarrassing.

 

 

Where was I? Oh, yes. Journals. I’ve started writing by hand again.  I explained my reasoning in this Medium post but in a nutshell, I discovered that writing by hand helped me follow a conversation better while taking notes for work meetings. I then discovered that writing by hand helped my creativity while writing fiction.  I’ve started writing new scenes by hand in a notebook and then transferring them to the computer to edit them there. It’s working well so far, as I plough through a major rewrite of my novel. Where I’d been struggling to keep the momentum going before, I’m writing at a good pace at the moment.

I can write anywhere with a notebook. Sometimes it’s just to jot down a thought before it’s forgotten. Others it’s to write a whole or partial scene. A character sketch. An overheard snippet of a conversation that might work well in a story (or spark a story). Anonymised, of course. Or a reminder of an idea that could turn into something bigger when I get the chance to mull it over.

I keep a notebook with me all the time now, along with a pack of those little note tags, so I can mark the spot where I wrote about a new idea, alongside a spot where I wrote a new scene for the novel.

I have a special notebook at home for writing down those things that bother me. It’s a purpose-made one that a friend bought me and it’s especially for those ‘why are people like that?’ moments. Some days I use it more than others.

I also have a notebook that I keep in my desk at work for work-related things: to-do list, upcoming things to think about, reminders to check for responses to my questions, notes from meetings.

Writing by hand is also having another beneficial effect; it’s improving my handwriting. I’ve been using fountain pens to write with instead of ball-points, and it slows me down and makes me write more carefully. After a couple of decades of typing virtually everything, my handwriting was awful. It’s still not the best but it’s improving all the time.

Being off the computer more, is also helping my peace of mind. Less social media, less procrastinating, fewer opportunities to get drawn into a futile argument with someone I don’t know over something I have no control over. I know things are awful, politically, but arguing with people on the Internet isn’t going to make any difference. I’m not going to change anyone’s political outlook with a pointed tweet, no matter how pithy I think it is. That doesn’t mean I don’t think I can do anything, just that I should focus my energies where I can achieve something.

So yes, I heartily recommend buying notebooks and journals. Take your writing with you wherever you go. Write wherever and whenever the opportunity arises. And get those negative thoughts out where they can’t fester. Examine them honestly and work through them.

Thanks for reading. Now I’m going to go write in the sunshine.

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H is for Hook

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It doesn’t matter whether you’re writing fiction, journalism, marketing copy, or an essay; if you want to claim your reader’s attention, you need a hook. The hook is what makes the reader want to continue reading and comes within the opening paragraph.

Since I mostly write fiction, I’ll be concentrating on that, but hopefully this will be helpful for writers in all fields.

Think of all the stories you’ve read, whether they’re novels or short stories. What makes you continue past that first paragraph? For me, it’s the promise made that this is going to be something I will enjoy reading. The author doesn’t always follow through (I’ve stopped reading novels and stories that had great openings because they didn’t fulfil that promise), but for the most part I can usually tell that this is going to be my kind of read from what’s in that first paragraph, or even in the opening line.

We see lots of advice on not to use certain things for openings because they have been done so often they become cliché: someone looking in a mirror, the weather, someone talking, someone waking up. And yet, a good writer can take these clichés over-done openings and make them into something new and original. Here are some examples below:

“Polly cut off her hair in front of the mirror, feeling slightly guilty about not feeling very guilty about doing so.”  – Monstrous Regiment, Terry Pratchett.

monstrousThis is the opening to one of my all time favourite novels. Polly Perks is cutting off her hair, so she can pretend to be a boy and join the army to look for her lost brother. When people use mirrors, they tend to do so to describe the character’s appearance, which is a cliché, but in this case, Pratchett used it to show us something about Polly’s character rather than her appearance. Cutting her hair off is something she is expected to feel guilty about, so we can tell immediately that she’s in a world where society believes women and girls should have long hair. The fact that she doesn’t feel guilty enough tells us that she’s independent and can think for herself. I’m immediately interested in Polly.

“The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel.” – Neuromancer, William Gibson.

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I like this opening because it gives me a sense of something being not quite right. The language is stark, and the image is foreboding. It’s also unusual as far as a weather description goes. I can’t say I’ve ever seen a sky that colour before, so perhaps it’s somewhere other than earth? I’m pulled in to read further so that I can find out more about this place.

 

“A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.” – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Philip K. Dick

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This opening has someone waking up but it’s the mood organ that makes me want to read on because I immediately know we’re either not in this world, or if we are it’s somewhere in an imagined future.

 

 

“They’re made out of meat.” – Terry Bisson

“They’re Made out of Meat”  is one of my favourite short stories. Not only does it open with dialogue, but the whole story is a conversation between two disembodied voices. There is no narrative, no description, no action, just dialogue. Everything about this story is a literary ‘no-no’, and yet it works perfectly.

Of course, these are all notable exceptions. I’m not saying that we should all go out and ignore the advice on not using cliched openings. These are examples of what a skilled writer can do with something that is considered a cliché.

A good opening line or paragraph sets an expectation of who or what the novel, story, article or essay will be about. It also sets the tone of the piece of writing, whether that be matter of fact, foreboding, humorous, etc. In speculative fiction, it also often gives us a glimpse into another world.

“I did two things on my seventy-fifth birthday. I visited my wife’s grave. Then I joined the army.” Old Man’s War –  John Scalzi

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This opening starts off normal enough for a seventy-five-year-old man. Then boom, Scalzi turns that impression upside down and we’re immediately asking ourselves questions because joining the army is probably the last thing we’d expect a man that age to do.

 

 

“Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western Spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun.” Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams

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I love this opening. If you know anything about the galaxy or solar system, you immediately know that this is earth we’re talking about here. There’s a self-deprecating humour in the way it’s written that is so English and so endearing that I immediately want to read on.

 

 

“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.” Metamorphosis – Franz Kafka

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This one is so matter-of-factly talking about something so odd that it is an immediate draw. There’s no sense of panic, no terror, which creates a kind of morbid fascination. Just what has happened to Gregor? We need to know.

 

 

I’ve often found that I don’t know the opening line until I’ve written the whole story. I start at the beginning, of course, but it’s mostly just a placeholder until I’ve written the whole thing and know how it ends. Then, when I’m going back to edit, I look at the opening and fiddle with it until it becomes the hook I need for that particular story.

What was the most memorable opening line you remember reading? Or better still, give me an example of an opening line of your own. Here’s one of mine to leave you with:

“Whispers flitted across his mind. Distant voices murmuring words he could not quite grasp; like moth wings, they brushed memories he had tried for so long to forget, wafting loose the shrouds he had wrapped around them over so many years with so many empty wine-skins.”  The Lost Weaver

G is for Groups – writing groups

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Writing can be a lonely business. Especially early on, when it feels as though it’s impossible to know whether your writing is any good, or what you need to improve. You can share your writing, of course, and your family will give you all the encouragement and support you need to keep going. To learn writing as a craft, though, you need input from people who know the craft. This is where workshops and writing groups come in.

Sharing your writing with people other than your mum is always a daunting experience. Receiving a rejection from an unseen editor is bad enough, but having someone go through and point out all the weak spots and areas for improvement can feel like those dreams where you forget to get dressed and realise you’ve gone to work naked.

Oh, you don’t have those? Okay, moving on.

I’ve joined a few writing groups over the years and found them extremely helpful. Here are some non-profit ones I’ve taken part in (links in the titles where available).

Critters

I joined Critters way back in the late 90s, when I first started online. I thought it might help me with the writing portion of my university coursework, and it did. Through Critters, I got to know a lady who would become a great friend, and whom I’m still yet to meet in person. Hopefully, one day. I interviewed her – Elizabeth Kelley Buzbee – here on my blog, a couple of years ago about one of her novels.

Joining Critters taught me how to give and receive critiques of my writing. It also let me take that first step in sharing my writing with people for the specific purpose of receiving feedback. I’d recommend it to any writers in the SF, Fantasy or Horror genres. You are required to put in a bit of work to earn the critiques (at least one critique a week), but the reciprocity works out. Andrew Burt, the guy who runs the site, is a genuinely nice man. Not only that, but the site is completely free and relies solely on donations from good-hearted Critters.

Dargonzine

I joined Dargonzine around the same time as Critters. It’s less a writing group and more of a shared world writing experience. It does have the same feel as a writing group, though, and all the stories are workshopped before they’re published. Again, it gave me more experience of workshopping my writing and what I learned there I could apply to my non-Dargon writing.

Beaverton Evening Writers

I joined this group when I moved to Portland, Oregon, and I was excited because they were my first face-to-face group. I was also extremely nervous!  I needn’t have been, though, because they were lovely.  They meet every two weeks, send writing ahead of time and give the critiques in person. This allows for a kinder, more gentle delivery of critical feedback, which I think is essential.

After I moved away from Portland, I kept in touch with the writers and we put a short story collection together for charity: Five Elements Anthology.  I follow the blogs of two of the writers. Sheron Wood McCartha writes excellent Sci-Fi book reviews, and D. Wallace-Peach blogs about writing, her novels and all manner of interesting subjects. Check them out.

Youwriteon

This is another online group, supported by the Arts Council of Great Britain. While the site looks a bit old-fashioned (it’s been around quite a few years and could probably do with some TLC), the feedback is pretty good, and if you get enough reviews there’s a chance to get feedback from people in the publishing industry. You don’t have to work as hard as some sites to get your work reviewed (critiques appear to be one for one, and they give you the first one free). They also offer a free self-publishing service on a partner site, Feed-a-read.

Northwrite SF

When I came back to the UK I missed being part of a face-to-face group and looked around for something similar to the way the Beaverton group worked. I found it in Northwrite SF, run by Jacey Bedford (you should check out her novels, she writes wonderfully engaging SF and fantasy and is published by DAW).  I’ve learned a lot from this group. They’re all lovely people who read and critique with a keen eye, and give honest, constructive feedback. They meet quarterly in Yorkshire.

I also have a great critique partner, whom I also met while in Oregon but not through the Beaverton group. We swap about 3,000 words a week on our works in progress and look at the big picture stuff rather than pick over line edits. We keep each other going when the energy to write is low and one of these days I know I’m going to be introducing her debut novel, so watch this space!

As part of my coursework for my upcoming MFA in Creative Writing at Manchester Metropolitan University, I’ll be workshopping with my fellow students, which I’m excited about. I’m sure the experience I’ve gained through all these fab groups will help me support others through their learning progress and teach me more about my own writing at the same time.

What about you? Do you workshop your writing with others?

F is for … Foreshadowing

I’m late posting this week; things have been busy, and the blog post I thought I’d be publishing this week isn’t happening yet (but will be something to look forward to in the future, I hope!).

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I’ve also had some brilliant news: I had a telephone interview yesterday with one of the tutors at Manchester Metropolitan University’s Writing School and have been offered a place on their MFA in Creative Writing, starting September. I’m so excited! I’m also terrified I won’t measure up.

Once I submitted the application, I tortured myself for two weeks. If you write, you’ll know what I mean. From the moment I sent off the paperwork (containing a writing sample, book review, reference and personal statement), I started to doubt everything. One moment I’d think, ‘this is a good sample of my work,’ and the next I’d think, ‘Who wrote this rubbish? They’re going to laugh me out the door!’ I seriously considered asking if I could withdraw and submit again.

Luckily, I didn’t. The tutor I spoke with liked my writing, and, after a brief chat, offered me a place! Now I just have to wait for the official offer.

Did I mention I was excited?

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Right, now that’s out of the way, let’s get to this week’s post.

Foreshadowing

You may have heard the term before. In a nutshell, foreshadowing is where you drop clues in the story about something significant that will happen later. Usually, the clues are subtle, so that the reader might not think anything of them until the important event happens and then – if you’ve done a good job – they’ll say ‘Oh yes! I should have seen that coming!’

Sometimes, the writer will try to disguise foreshadowing by misdirection. They might have the main characters dismiss something as impossible and never going to happen, but then, of course, it does.

Or they may use nature. Nothing says there’s trouble ahead like a raging storm, or animals acting oddly.

The trick is to make the foreshadowing innocuous enough for the reader to absorb it as background detail, or worldbuilding if it’s speculative fiction. Details that seem minor and vaguely interesting at the time we read them, are rendered pivotal at the novel’s climax. Or at least they should. There’s a fine line between innocuous and forgettable. Don’t make your foreshadowing too noticeable or you’ll puncture the suspense you’ve so carefully built, and don’t make it too unnoticeable or it won’t give the reader that ‘Oh, of course!’ feeling later.

Examples

In Lord of the Rings, Tolkein foreshadows the climax at Mount Doom:

‘Pity? It’s a pity that stayed Bilbo’s hand. Many that live deserve death. Some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them, Frodo? Do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment. Even the very wise cannot see all ends. My heart tells me that Gollum has some part to play in it, for good or evil, before this is over. The pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many.’

In ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, Harper Lee foreshadows the novel’s main story arc.

I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.

What are your favourite foreshadowing moments?

 

 

 

 

Hi Honey, I’m home!

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*Pulls light switch*

*Blinks*

“Oh hi! Is this still here?”

“I wonder if it still works?”

*Blows dust off the chair*

*coughs and splutters*

“Oh my, look at that spider’s web.”

*pulls spider web down*

*Spider comes running out with her front legs up in the air, ready to fight*

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Sorry!”

Ahem.

It’s been a while, hasn’t it? I’m sorry for staying away so long. I’ve been so busy. Where to start?  I’ll tell you what, while I try to decide what I want to blog about, I’ll do a weekly, writing-related A-Z. How does that sound?

Right then, starting with A.

Allusion

We use allusion in our everyday conversation, often without realising, and it’s quite an easy tool to use in writing, as long as it’s not over-done.

So, what is it?

Have you ever known someone who tells a lot of lies, and told them that their nose ought to be a foot long with all the lies they tell?

That’s allusion.

You’re referring to the story of Pinocchio, whose nose grew an inch every time he told a lie. Instead of having to tell the whole story of Pinocchio, you can conjure up an image in their mind with just a few words, because they already know what happens.

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When is it useful?

Allusion can be useful when you don’t want to go into a lengthy description of a cameo character. You can write, ‘Jenny’s husband  was a bit of a David Brent,’ and most people will get an immediate picture of the character and his personality.

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Here are a couple more:

“She did a Cathy Earnshaw onto the bed and began sobbing.”

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“She gave him a look that said, ‘bovvered?”

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So, over to you. Give me an allusion you’re fond of using, or one that you can’t stand.

Author Interview – Aderyn Wood

AderynWood (2)In my continuing series of author interviews, I’m excited to introduce Australian writer and fellow cat-lover, Aderyn Wood. After reading and thoroughly enjoying her novella, The Viscount’s Son, when I learned that she had a new book coming out—a novel this time—my interest was piqued. I asked Aderyn to chat with me about her new release.

 

 

The Borderlands - E-Book Cover[CJ] Aderyn, The Borderlands (gorgeous cover, by the way) is very different from The Viscount’s Son. Apart from being a novel length work, it’s also a different genre. I don’t often foray into YA, but I do enjoy a good read, and this is definitely a good read. In your own words, what’s the most important thing you’d like readers to know about The Borderlands?

[Aderyn] Thanks CJ. I love the cover too! The artist Taire Morrigan worked hard to create a visual representation of a key thread in which Dale undertakes a journey to find the mystical Borderlands – on her little sailboat called ‘Joy’.

This is a tough question. I think I’d like readers to know that The Borderlands is probably more of a coming of age story than a typical YA fantasy. It’s also an adventure story. YA fantasies tend to focus on a secret magical talent of the protagonist; and romance. Of course Borderlands has these elements but I wanted to add a sense of adventure to this story too. So Dale goes through a number of challenges, physically, emotionally and mentally, as she embarks on an adventurous journey, all of which enables her to learn about who she truly is and develop as a character.

[CJ] The artist definitely did a great job of bringing that thread to life. I did love following Dale’s adventures in Borderlands, as well as getting to know her. At the beginning of the story, she is a loner who doesn’t seem to fit in anywhere, even at home. She’s also very easy to invest in because she has such a great voice. Of course, there’s a reason for her not fitting in, which goes beyond the usual teenage angst (which I won’t go into for fear of giving out spoilers) but I loved her independent spirit and wit right from the start. What do you like most about her?

[Aderyn] I love how smart she is and how she can see through to the core of a person’s identity. In the story she befriended a couple of other misfits in the form of two old homeless people – Gareth and Joan. Gareth and Joan live in an abandoned old hospital by the river Clyde (set in Scotland), and Dale spends much of her time with Old Man Gareth – her only real friend. Through them, Dale shows us how she sees people for who they truly are inside; she doesn’t judge according to appearance or social status. She values people for who they are. But this also means that she can spot cruelty and pretention easily, and she has little tolerance for people like that. Unfortunately for Dale, most of the students at the exclusive international school she attends (St Nino’s) are bullies or snobs.

[CJ] Her relationship with Gareth definitely shows us the depth of Dale’s character. Many teenage female characters are written as weak/needing help, only interested in fashion and boys (one of the main reasons I don’t tend to read a lot of YA). Did you deliberately set out to overturn that stereotype?

[Aderyn] I didn’t set out to challenge any stereotype, and if I’m going to be honest, I don’t read a lot of YA myself. I simply wrote this story as truthfully as I could, about a girl who felt so different from her family that it caused great tension, especially as she is not able to fit in with peers at school. I set out to show how someone like that would cope in such a situation. Her mother, a fervent social climber, doesn’t understand Dale and would prefer that she did something more fashionable with her hair, or went shopping, rather than reading or painting. Dale drew on the strengths she did have, particularly her intelligence, curiosity and sense of adventure, to overcome the challenges that came her way.

[CJ] You convey all those things about Dale very well. More than anything, The Borderlands struck me as a rite-of-passage story. Along with the reader, Dale learns a lot about herself and her strengths as well as who she is. Is that the kind of story you set out to write when you began, or did it develop as you wrote?

[Aderyn] I agree, that’s how I see this story. While I didn’t set out to write this initially, it very quickly became apparent that the story was all about Dale and how she comes of age. The second book in the series begins a year after the events at the end of Book One, and readers will see a different, more mature Dale, but will understand how she grew to be that person through the trials she experienced in this first book of the trilogy.

[CJ] Great! I will look forward to seeing the more mature Dale, and how her character develops from here. I’m sure readers will love seeing her development in The Borderlands, which is available now on Amazon. I know you’re an indie publisher, Aderyn. There’s a rather steep learning curve in indie publishing—which I found out through releasing my own book of short stories. What did you find the most useful thing to learn through publishing The Viscount’s Son that helped you with The Borderlands?

[Aderyn] The most useful thing I’ve learnt so far is to just keep writing. Yes, it’s wonderful when readers buy your book and even better when they review it or email you with messages saying how much they enjoyed it – that truly is wonderful! But the reality is that indies are mostly unknown authors and they are not going to sell millions or attract a lot of attention initially. According to my reading, most indie authors only start receiving a regular income (and not even one they can necessarily live on) after they have released 5-15 books. So I just keep writing.

[CJ] That feeling is great, isn’t it? I love hearing from people who read my writing. But you’re so right—we have to keep writing. What’s the best piece of advice you could give to a writer poised to take the plunge into indie publishing?

[Aderyn] I think it’s important to be positive. l have seen a few authors complaining about sales or the whole publishing industry in blog posts and forums. While constructive criticism of publishing certainly has its place, I think being too negative can make authors come across as bitter. I can feel doubtful and deflated at times, but a positive outlook gives a better impression to potential readers. I really believe in the saying ‘Nothing succeeds like success’. So look at every sale, every review and every new reader as a success and celebrate it.

[CJ] That’s so true, Aderyn. I think people respond better to a positive attitude. Thanks for taking the time to talk to me! I wish you all the best with your novel, and I’m more than pleased to recommend it to anyone who loves a good story and great characters. I can’t to see what’s in store for Dale next.

[Aderyn] Thanks CJ! I always enjoy reading your author interviews, you ask great questions. I’m also looking forward to seeing what will happen with Dale next! I hope to release the second book in the series next year.

[CJ] I’ll be watching out for it. Well that’s it for this interview. I hope you have enjoyed learning about Aderyn and The Borderlands as much as I did.

Aderyn Wood enjoys reading and writing fantasy fiction most. Her debut publication, ‘The Viscount’s Son’ is a paranormal novella and has earned many five star reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. ‘The Borderlands: Journey’ is her second publication and she hopes to release another stand-alone fantasy book later in the year. Aside from fiction, Aderyn loves gardening, cooking and drinking the odd glass of pinot noir. Like most fantasy authors, Aderyn enjoys the company of her cat, who stays by her side during the long and lonely hours of writing.